Notes on ‘team responsibilities in cloud-native operations’ (Pete Mounce)

Summary:  Pete Mounce (@petemounce) from Just Eat gave a compelling talk at the London Continuous Delivery meetup group on ‘team responsibilities in cloud-native operations’. I found the talk hugely engaging, with loads of detail applicable to many organisations. Here are my notes from the meetup.

I captured my notes as slides:

Update: the video of Pete’s talk is here on Vimeo:

Pete Mounce video frame

There were several specific points made by Pete that were interesting for me:

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Using Chef for infrastructure automation – reading list

I have recently read (and re-read) several books on Chef in order that I can recommend books to clients who are starting with infrastructure automation (and to remind myself of the more obscure uses of knife, encrypted databags, and so on). In this post I comment on these books:

  • Chef Infrastructure Automation Cookbook by Matthias Marschall
  • Managing Windows Servers with Chef by John Ewart
  • Test-Driven Infrastructure with Chef (2nd Edition) by Stephen Nelson-Smith
  • Automation Through Chef Opscode by Navin Sabharwal and Manak Wadhwa

Summary: read Chef Infrastructure Automation Cookbook for a good introduction to Chef on both Linux and Windows; read Managing Windows Servers with Chef if you manage many Windows machines; but most of all read Test-Driven Infrastructure with Chef because without a test-driven approach your infrastructure code will rapidly become tangled, unsupported, and obsolete.

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The most common DevOps adoption mistake, and other answers – interview for DevOpsFriday5

I was interviewed recently by the folks at Ranger4 for their #DevOpsFriday5 question series. Since  June 2014 (when I was interviewed) I have published a couple of things which expand on the original answers, so I have outlined these here.  The questions were:

  1. What’s your preferred definition of DevOps?
  2. When people ‘do’ DevOps, what’s the most common mistake you see them make?
  3. How do you recommend an organisation new to DevOps start?
  4. What’s your prediction for what DevOps will look like in 2020?
  5. Where do you like to go to get a DevOps hit?

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Early version of our book ‘Build Quality In’ now available to buy

I am very pleased that the first version of the Build Quality In book has been published on LeanPub, with contributions from Chris O’Dell and Dave Farley (co-author of the book Continuous Delivery). The book is edited by me and Steve Smith.

In the spirit of  ‘lean’, we’re publishing a new version of the book whenever one or two additional contributions are ready; you can see the expected publication schedule on the LeanPub page. Buyers of the book receive free updates for life, so buy your copy now at the early bird price!

Build Quality In - book cover

Operability: a DevOps cornerstone – new eBook from HighOps

HighOps operability eBook - coverOne of the driving forces behind DevOps is the increasing prevalence of complex, distributed software systems which calls for a substantially different approach to building ‘business’ software systems: an approach that anticipates and expects failures, transient behaviour, emergent states, and unpredictability; and ensures that failure responses are gradual, graceful, and graphable.

‘Making software work well’ in this dynamic, interconnected world is the focus of Software Operability, a subject I have been writing and speaking about for some time.

I recently began working with IT operations experts HighOps (@gotHighOps) and we have published a free eBook Operability: a DevOps Cornerstone. The book covers the fundamentals of operability, why it’s relevant, how to build and sustain a focus on operability,and how operability relates to both DevOps and IT service management approaches such as ITIL.

If you lead the Technology division, head up a software development department or IT operations department, or lead a development or operations team, and want to understand why and how to make your software systems work better, then this book is for you. If you are involved in Service Transition or Service Operation, this eBook will help you to make the case for a strong focus on the operational aspects of the software being delivered. Similarly, if your role is a Software Architect, you will find here sound practical guidance for improving how your software works
in Production.

Download the HighOps eBook ‘Operability: a DevOps Cornerstone’ here.

Experience Reports Book on Continuous Delivery and DevOps – ‘Build Quality In’

Cover Image - Build Quality InContinuous Delivery and DevOps are difficult. In many organisations the creation of an automated deployment pipeline is impeded by significant technology challenges, and encouraging Development and Operations teams to work together can seem impossible.

In order to help teams adopt and sustain Continuous Delivery and DevOps, Steve Smith and I decided to put together a book of experience reports – Build Quality In – with contributions from fellow practitioners in these fields.

We have a growing list of really excellent contributors, and we are using LeanPub and its ‘lean’ publication model to make available the content as soon as each chapter is ready – no ‘big bang’ releases! The book is available to buy now on LeanPub, and updates will be made throughout the summer of 2014, with all chapters expected to be ‘done’ by September 2014.

70% of royalties from the book will be donated to the UK non-profit organisation Code Club, which inspires kids to learn how to use computers to build software systems. We wanted to support an organisation that is active in engaging and shaping future engineers (both female and male), and Code Club is doing a great job.

We’re excited to be working with so many talented people on this book, which we hope will become a useful resource for people working in a Continuous Delivery or DevOps context.

Resources

 

DevOps Questions from Unicom DevOps Summit Feb 2014

At the Unicom DevOps Summit event in London on February 28th 2014 we experimented with some extra audience/attendee participation by asking for questions on record cards and encouraged people to ‘dot-vote‘ on the questions most interesting to them. There were some good questions, but unfortunately we did not get chance to discuss many of them, so here are all the questions from the card board, along with some very brief attempts at answers.

  • Should security be a part of DevOps?
  • To what extent and how do you insist on standardisation for multiple Scrum + ‘DevOps’ teams with no separate Operations team?
  • What’s the likely process flow of / disruptions to / duration of DevOps adoption?
  • Where does ‘Operations’ sit in the ITIL model? All over the place? e.g. Service Transition?
  • How about some example scenarios? Tangible comparison points would be useful.
  • Where does DevOps start and finish (from a process perspective)?
  • Is DevOps just a job title?
  • Is co-location of resource necessary for successful DevOps?
  • How essential is cloud technology to DevOps?
  • How will the announcement that ThoughtWorks are ‘open sourcing’ their Go DevOps product affect other vendor products? Why pay for other products?
  • There are a lot of open source DevOps/release/orchestration tools – is anyone using (or know about) the Windows equivalent?
  • How do you overcome developer resistance to writing Run Book docs? Are the processes to drive adoption? Is it a sackable offence?

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